The We the Women Campaign hopes that the views expressed in the survey will inform the international community’s efforts to address global issues in the years to come, including at the Summit of the Future that will take place in September 2024.

The We the Women Campaign is an initiative of the DSG’s Women Rise for All, which is working to highlight the transformational leadership of women in addressing the world’s most pressing crises.

25854 RESPONSES
185 COUNTRIES
63 %
BETWEEN 18 AND 34 YEARS OLD

“We would, together like to shape a future where the voices of women and girls resonate loudly and drive meaningful change. Our voices are going to carry, not only for this generation but also for generations to come.”

Dr. Brantuo, We the Women Intergenerational Dialogue, Namibia

1. WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP

The survey revealed that a large majority of women polled around the world are willing to contribute to efforts aimed at advancing women’s rights and participation in government.

An impressive majority (60%) think that women's representation in leadership in their country will progress over the next decade. Only 10% overall feel it will regress and 23% are not sure. The ratios are strong in every region. An overwhelming 85% percent of our respondents consider themselves to be “women's rights advocates,” which is true across every region – 87% in Africa, 81% in Asia, 77% in Eastern Europe, 90% in Latin America, and 85% in the West.

How many respondents consider themselves to be “women’s rights advocates”?

87% AFRICA
81% ASIA
77% EASTERN EUROPE
90% LATIN AMERICA
85% WEST

2. BARRIERS FOR CHANGE

Although women are a force for positive change, they continue to face barriers that might prevent them from realizing their full potential and contributing to their communities and countries.

Mental health is major issue for almost half of the women of the world. Disproportionate burden on women of domestic and care work is also reported as a major issue for 40% of women that would prevent them from being better off in the next 5 years.

What are the obstacles that might prevent you from having a better quality of life in the next five years?

46% MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES
42% Time intensive care of children, family, others
41% Gender inequality in household work
29% Insufficient access to sexual / reproductive health & rights
27% Domestic violence

3. WOMEN AND THE SDGs

Among the SDGs, women consider health and education as significant prerequisites for achieving global goals. In a record year for elections around the world, women rank living in peaceful countries, where justice prevails and institutions are strong, as one of the top three priorities.

SDG 3 - Good health and well-being- is ranked among top 3 by 40% of women, SDG 4 – quality education – by 38% of women and SDG 16 - Peace, Justice and strong institutions – by 38% of women.

Within the 17 Sustainable Development Goals, what are the 3 most important to you?

4. Climate change and conflict on women’s minds for their future

Women around the world expect war and climate change to be two major challenges that will increasingly affect them in the next decade.

More than half of the women of the world – and 70% of women in Eastern Europe - are affected by armed conflict or think they will be affected by war in the next decade.
86% of the women of the world are affected by climate change or think they will be affected by climate change in the next decade with a foreseen impact on their health and in terms of natural disasters.
When asked about the extend to which key issues affect women now versus the next decade, what is most significant is the dramatic rises in concern over climate change (9 points); and war and conflict (10 points).
When it comes to climatechange, women say they expect to be most impacted when it comes to their health and in terms of natural disasters.

In which ways will climate change most impact you?

73% health (quality air & water)
62% natural disasters
37% scarcity of food
25% loss of economic opportunities
18% war & conflict
14% forced displacement

5. Climate change and conflict on women’s minds for their future

Women around the world expect war and climate change to be two major challenges that will increasingly affect them in the next decade.

More than half of the women of the world – and 70% of women in Eastern Europe - are affected by armed conflict or think they will be affected by war in the next decade.
86% of the women of the world are affected by climate change or think they will be affected by climate change in the next decade with a foreseen impact on their health and in terms of natural disasters.
When asked about the extend to which key issues affect women now versus the next decade, what is most significant is the dramatic rises in concern over climate change (9 points); and war and conflict (10 points).
When it comes to climatechange, women say they expect to be most impacted when it comes to their health and in terms of natural disasters.

To what extent will the following key issues affect you now? And in the next decade?

NOW
50%
NEXT DECADE
59%
climate change
NOW
50%
NEXT DECADE
50%
economic insecurity
NOW
48%
NEXT DECADE
45%
gender inequality
NOW
44%
NEXT DECADE
44%
insufficient social protections
NOW
43%
NEXT DECADE
44%
gender-based violence
NOW
42%
NEXT DECADE
43%
weak education systems
NOW
36%
NEXT DECADE
43%
war / conflict
NOW
33%
NEXT DECADE
41%
lack of access to healthcare
NOW
32%
NEXT DECADE
39%
food insecurity
NOW
27%
NEXT DECADE
30%
lack of access to technology

6. artificial intelligence will be positive for many

Over twice as many women see Artificial Intelligence as an opportunity rather than a threat, but expect negative effects in certain areas of life.

AI receives mixed reviews. On the whole, about twice as many (45%) view AI as an opportunity while over 24% say it is mainly a threat, and 19% are not sure. Younger women (18-34 years old) are more inclined to see the positives in the impact of artificial intelligence. 48% of them sees AI as more of an opportunity than a threat, against 41% for older women. More positive view-about 50%- were expressed in every region except the West, where only 39% thought AI is an opportunity. Two thirds of the women of the world think Artificial Intelligence is positive for their education, less than one third think it can have a positive effect on their security and civil liberties. Women in Western Europe and North America are the only ones who are fearing repercussions of AI on their jobs.

POSITIVE
NEGATIVE
POSITIVE
64%
NEGATIVE
16%
50% EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
POSITIVE
41%
NEGATIVE
33%
50% YOUR JOB PROSPECTS
POSITIVE
31%
NEGATIVE
39%
50% YOUR INDIVIDUAL SECURITY
POSITIVE
29%
NEGATIVE
3%
3% YOUR HUMAN / CIVIL LIBERTIES
23% CLIMATE ACTION

7. Providing Solutions

Women of the world think countries do not work well enough together on all key issues and are a strong voice for inclusive multilateralism.

In your opinion, which ones of the following actions would be the most helpful in ensuring that women’s voices and perspectives help shape the future of the world?

% countries
working well
34%
% countries
not working well
59%
lack of access to tech
% countries
working well
30%
% countries
not working well
57%
gender inequality
% countries
working well
29%
% countries
not working well
62%
lack of access to health care
% countries
working well
27%
% countries
not working well
57%
weak education systems
% countries
working well
27%
% countries
not working well
52%
climate change
% countries
working well
26%
% countries
not working well
55%
food insecurity
% countries
working well
25%
% countries
not working well
58%
gender based violence
% countries
working well
24%
% countries
not working well
45%
insufficient social protection
% countries
working well
21%
% countries
not working well
57%
economic insecurity
% countries
working well
19%
% countries
not working well
54%
war and conflict

8. Providing Solutions

Women of the world think their voices should be heard in shaping the future of the world.

69% of women of the world say they need to be better represented in leadership positions at the national and global levels to allow women’s voices and perspectives play a larger role in shaping the future of the world. Strongwomen also called for more inclusive multilateral institutions that are open to listening regularly to women’s voices, including through women’s organizations.

In your opinion, which ones of the following actions would be the most helpful in ensuring that women’s voices and perspectives help shape the future of the world?

69% more leadership positions
48% collecting women’s voices on a regular basis
41% more consultations on global matters
37% more women as heads of governments
intergenerational
dialogues

The United Nations Office for Partnerships and the polling company John Zogby Strategies surveyed women of the world on the future they want.

The survey is the central piece of the We the Women Campaign that was launched by United Nations Deputy Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed and German Minister of Foreign Development and Cooperation Svenja Schulze in September 2023 at the margins of the SDG Summit.

intergenerational
dialogues

This benchmark We the Women survey marks just the beginning. Alongside the results of Intergenerational Dialogues held in key countries around the world, it will inform decisions made by world leaders and the international community for years to come, beginning with the Summit of the Future in September 2024.

intergenerational
dialogues
intergenerational
dialogues

Alongside the global survey, intergenerational dialogues are being held at country level to gather perspectives of women on key issues and challenges, as well as solutions for the future..

Intergenerational Dialogues took place in Barbados, Bhutan, Chile, Honduras, Jordan, Morocco, Nigeria and Namibia. Women from diverse age groups and backgrounds came together to discuss key challenges they are facing now and into the future.

Morocco

In Morocco, participants raised that women who work face numerous challenges and constraints (care work, family, no flexibility in working hours, etc.). Unpaid care work must be acknowledged, and long-term strategies must be set in place to promote a better work-life balance for women.

Bhutan

In Bhutan, participants highlighted that advances in healthcare, especially in reducing maternal mortality rates, have significantly improved the status and empowerment of women.

Honduras

In Honduras, participants highlighted the level of discrimination, including in terms of access to education, work, or political life for people with disabilities. In the case of women with disabilities, discrimination is even more severe, they noted.

Nigeria

In Nigeria, women stated that the inclusion of women's voices in global affairs can produce transformative results such as more gender-responsive policy advocacy and formulation. Women bring unique perspectives and experiences which can inform policies that better address the intersecting needs of diverse populations. Further, the inclusion of women especially women from conflict and marginalized communities in decision-making would lead to more inclusive approaches to peace and security processes, addressing the root causes of conflict and instability.

Namibia

In Namibia, concerns were raised about the gendered distribution of digital skills and access to technology, particularly in rural areas, and the importance of educating women and girls on online safety.

Barbados

In Barbados, women discussed how priorities change when women’s voices are more included in global affairs. Intergenerational engagement and a growing presence of young women in movement building also emerged as a source of hope.

methodology

The United Nations Office for Partnerships will continue to check-in, as requested by the survey’s participants, with the women of the world to inquire about their priorities and challenges and to observe how these evolve over time. It will also continue to collaborate with key partners to ensure that women play a full part in shaping the future of the world.

methodology

The United Nations Office for Partnerships commissioned John Zogby Strategies to conduct a worldwide survey of adult women.

Zogby Strategies did not employ a method of “random probability sampling” but instead relied on the global dissemination network of the United Nations, partners, and UN Online Volunteers.

The survey was offered in the six official United Nations languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish) plus Portuguese.